Dubrovnik – Mostar – Sarajevo

I left Dubrovnik about 8.30am this morning but on the way out, I stopped at a lay-by on the road above the city and got some more photos.

A view of the old cit of Dubrovnik taken from the road out of town
A view of the old cit of Dubrovnik taken from the road out of town

Within a few minutes of leaving Dubrovnik I was at the Croatia-Bosnia border. At the Bosnia side, the police officer checking passports wanted to see my vehicle documents, specifically the registration document and my insurance green card. I produced my insurance document with the ‘green card’ replacement information and an endorsement saying that the insurance covers Bosnia. No good! They want to see an actual green card document. I pointed out that the EU no longer provides actual green cards and that this document is accepted throughout the EU as a replacement. I was soon told that Bosnia is not part of the EU and is not bound to accept documents that they have adopted. I was then told quite bluntly that I have two choices – buy border insurance from the little hut or turn around and go back to Croatia! So, 30 Euros coughed up for five days of vehicle insurance for Bosnia and I was on my way!

Once over the border, I headed to Mostar to see its famous bridge. I arrived there before noon and paid for one hour on the parking meter. It was going to be a quick visit. The Mostar Bridge was first completed in 1566 having taken nine years to build. It was a remarkable feat of engineering in its day and is a wonderful example of a single span stone bridge.  Unfortunately, the bridge was destroyed in 1993 during the war here. It has subsequently been repaired and the area is now a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Stari Most - Old Bridge - in Mostar. Viewed from the town side
Stari Most – Old Bridge – in Mostar. Viewed from the town side
A view from the bridge
A view from the bridge
Tourists on the bridge watch for a diver to jump off
Tourists on the bridge watch for a diver to jump off
A diver seeks more donations from the crowd before he will jump off the bridge
A diver seeks more donations from the crowd before he will jump off the bridge
Point of impact as a 'diver' hits the water after jumping of the bridge
Point of impact as a ‘diver’ hits the water after jumping of the bridge
A view of the bridge from below
A view of the bridge from below
Another shot of the bridge
Another shot of the bridge from a little further down-river
There is an abundance of brass shell casings left over from the war, so they are turned into art objects
There is an abundance of brass shell casings left over from the war, so they are turned into art objects
More decorated cartridge cases
More decorated cartridge cases
Artillery shell cases
Artillery shell cases
Rugs for sale in Mostar
Rugs for sale in Mostar

After my brief visit to Mostar, I continued north to Sarajevo where I checked in at the Hotel Latinski Most (Hotel Latin Bridge), named after the famous bridge that is very close by. The stone Latin Bridge dates back to about 1541 (although there was a wooden bridge at the site earlier). The bridge became famous (or infamous) in 1914 when Archduke Franz Ferdinand (heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne) and his wife Sophie (Duchess of Hohenberg) were assassinated at the corner next to the bridge. It was the murder of Archduke Ferdinand that started the first World War.

Hotel Latinski Most. That's my balcony above the Jordan sign.
Hotel Latinski Most. That’s my balcony above the Jordan sign.
Latinski Most (Latin Bridge) as viewed from in front of my hotel
Latinski Most (Latin Bridge) as viewed from in front of my hotel
The Sarajevo Assassination Museum - on the corner opposite the bridge
The Sarajevo Assassination Museum – on the corner opposite the bridge

Within an hour of my arrival in Sarajevo, a thunderstorm rolled in and chased me back to my hotel. It is still raining outside, but now that I’ve updated the blog, I think I’ll venture out and find something to eat. Hopefully it will be drier tomorrow so that I can explore the city some more.

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